Coronavirus Hits The Poor Hardest, But The Rich Claim More Emotional Damage
Posted on: 04/01/2020 05:38 PM

'Higher education' has produced an entire class of hyper sensitive narcissists who display a mewling sense of self-victimization reserved for the privileged; i.e. the same class that seeks open borders to the world and lauds the persecution of European American advocates.


Through “trigger warnings,” “safe spaces,” and political correctness, the left-wing education system’s infantilization of the educated and professional classes has paid dividends. The disparate class reactions to the coronavirus crisis and ensuing societal shutdown make this even more obvious.

A new Axios poll surveying the public on the crisis and the impact the coronavirus has had on their lives reveals a stark class-based divide.

The online survey of 1,355 adults found that the lower, lower-middle, and middle classes were much more likely to face adverse employment effects due to the coronavirus than the upper-middle and upper classes. A whopping 15% to 20% of respondents in the lower three class tiers said they had been either furloughed or their company had closed down, while almost all members of the upper class were able to work as normal or adjust and simply work from home.


Absolutely fascinating results from this new @axios poll: pic.twitter.com/67FoetxkHS
— Brad Polumbo (@brad_polumbo) April 1, 2020


“The survey finds Americans with less education and lower incomes far more likely either to have to keep showing up at their workplaces — putting themselves at greater daily risk of infection — or more likely to have seen their work dry up,” Axios reports.


Coronavirus Hits The Poor Hardest, But The Rich Claim More Emotional Damage



"The rich and affluent have gone virtual,” Ipsos U.S. Public Affairs President Cliff Young told the digital news outlet. “They’ve maintained their jobs through the virtual world. The working and the poor are more exposed."

The wildest part? While the poor and working classes are clearly the ones bearing the biggest economic burden due to this crisis, and in many cases are the most at risk of contracting coronavirus, it’s the rich and upper-middle classes most likely to claim they’ve suffered “emotional harm.”

Poor much more adversely affected re: employment, but upper classes more likely to claim 'emotional harm.'

Coronavirus snowflakery? pic.twitter.com/s0XJFpJiNK
— Brad Polumbo (@brad_polumbo) April 1, 2020


Per the Axios polling, nearly 50% of respondents in the upper-middle and upper classes said their “emotional wellbeing has gotten worse,” while just about 1 in 3 members of the lower three classes surveyed said the same. Yes, that’s right: The hard-working middle and low-income citizens surveyed are, on average, facing much tougher times than their upper-class counterparts, but showing much more emotional resiliency.

I notice this in my own experience. The better off and more secure a person is, the more they complain about mental health and the damage of quarantining. Just a continuation of the self-victimization of the privileged. https://t.co/llAZi1pMdM
— You Should Have Voted For Gary (@colorblindk1d) April 1, 2020


Perhaps the better-off have greater access to information, meaning they’re more likely to watch the panicked, alarmist media coverage of the virus’s every development.

But more crucially, well-off white-collar workers are much more likely to have been through our higher education system. This means many were inevitably subjected to campus environments that place the highest value on “emotional safety,” teaching students they have the right to be free of speech that offends them and that upsetting things can be a threat to people’s very safety. Is it any surprise that the educated class would emerge emotionally fragile as a result?

Of course, it’s not the end of the world that some segments of society are feeling emotionally damaged by the coronavirus. But it doesn’t bode well for our country’s ability to emerge from this pandemic, or deal with future crises, that so many of our most well-off people are proving to be our most emotionally fragile.

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