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  • 27


     
    Thanks for the New Disease
    Health/Wellness; Posted on: 2007-04-23 09:44:23 [ Printer friendly / Instant flyer ]
    "Oral-fecal contamination is the standard route of transmission."

    Thanks to open-door immigration polices imposed by U.S. elites, a brain infection caused by a parasite normally not found in the U.S. is now a growing healh problem in states bordering Mexico, according to federal health experts.

    The disease, neurocysticercosis, is caused by a pork tapeworm that is endemic to Mexico. The federal Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta reported in February that "international travel and immigration" is bringing the disorder to the U.S. "Neurocysticercosis is the primary cause of epilepsy in endemic areas. This brain worm is very serious," said Victor T. Tsang, chief of immunochemistry in the Parasitic Disease Division of the CDC. "Oral-fecal contamination is the standard route of transmission." He said recent data collected by the CDC indicates that the disease is "an important cause of death in California."

    Federal health officials reported that "In Hispanics and Latinos, neurocysticercosis accounts for 13.5 percent of [U.S.] emergency room visits for seizures." They said the increase of U.S. cases "is mainly due to immigration from endemic developing countries." A person infected with the intestinal tapeworm will shed tapeworm eggs in bowel movements. Eggs accidentally swallowed by others cause infection when the worms infect the brain and spinal cord and form cysts. The eggs are often spread through food from infected food handlers. "So if you have people cooking for you or handling your food who are tapeworm carriers and don't have good personal hygiene, you will be exposed to the eggs of the tapeworm," said Tsang.

    Source

    TB or Not TB
    News Source: Middle American News

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